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Your narrator, the Leader
The Leader attended Pulpfest in Columbus, Ohio 21 - 23 July 2016. He enjoyed last year's show which he attended for the first time and plans to go every year from now on. The Leader loves comic books of course but he also is interested in pulp magazines and paperback books and original artwork for the same and Pulpfest is one of the few shows that has dealers selling lots of that type of merchandise.

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Second Day, Friday, 22 July
Dealer’s Room
Gene Carpenter
Gene Carpenter with his usual wonderful inventory of Golden and Silver Age comic books. I'll be seeing Gene again at the Baltimore Conic Con and Mid-Atlantic Nostalgia Con this September.
Phil Farina
Welcome to the spooky world of author Phil Farina with two of his “supernatural fiction” books, Gravesend and The Enochian Dilemma.
Phil Farina
Phil noted that Gravesend features in its plot an ouija board. I told him I had an ouija board when I was kid and I still remembered it moving by itself when you lightly touched it and asked it questions. Phil gave me a quick lesson on the history of early ouija boards before the toy company Milton-Bradley started making them. Phil confirmed my notion that ouija boards do indeed act as a conduit for energy in the human body.
Brian Livingston
I first met pulp and comic book dealer Brian Livingston at last year’s Pulpfest and took a picture of him holding a copy of the first issue from 1938 of the Martin Goodman pulp Marvel Science Stories.
Brian Livingston
Brian with Marvel Preview Presents Satana #7, 1976 featuring the first appearance of Rocket Raccoon and Marvel Preview Presents Star-Lord #4, 1976. Both of these were routine Marvel magazines nobody particularly cared about until the 2014 Marvel movie Guardians of the Galaxy catapulted them overnight into highly sought collectibles. They will remain that way for the indefinite future with another Guardians movie due out soon.
Mike Croteau & Paul Spiteri
I met Mike Croteau of the small press publishing company Meteor House at last year’s Pulpfest. He and his associates are the world’s experts on the science fiction writer Philip Jose Farmer.
Mike Croteau & Paul Spiteri
Mike and Paul with some of their Philip Jose Farmer books. If you have questions about Farmer you would do well to ask these guys.
Mark Hickman
Pulp dealer Mark Hickman is another dealer I met at last year’s Pulpfest. He has been around science fiction pulps a long time; his father was one of the original organizers of Pulpcon in the early 1970s. The painting Mark is showing here is by Lawrence Sterne Stevens for the story “Rebirth” in the pulp magazine Famous Fantastic Mysteries. Asking price is $7,500.
Ray Walsh
I first met Ray Walsh at a show he was promoting in Lansing, Michigan in the late 1990s. He is the long time owner of the Curious Book Shop in Lansing. This eye-catching painting is by Dean Ellis for the Andre Norton story “Eye Of The Monster.” Asking price is $4,000.
Philip Jose Farmer panel
The first presentation at night on Friday, 22 July was “FarmerCon 11 - Collaborating with Philip Jose Farmer.” Moderator Paul Spiteri and his three guests all talked about how they worked with Farmer to complete some of his unfinished novels. In some cases the collaborations were posthumous.
P.S. Farmer panel: Paul Spiteri, Christopher Paul Carey, Win Scott Eckert, Danny Adams
David Saunders
The second presentation was “The Artists of The Argosy: 120 Years of Sensational Pulp Artists” by David Saunders. David is the son of famous pulp magazine artist Norman Saunders. Here’s David with a slide of a newspaper headline on the death of Argosy pulp magazine founder Frank Munsey. Argosy, founded in 1882 is considered to be the first pulp magazine.
David Saunders
David ran through a long list of slides of some of Argosy’s most famous cover artists. Here’s Stockton Mulford with an Edgar Rice Burroughs story “Tarzan and the Ant-Men.” Burroughs novels were frequently serialized in Argosy or other pulps before being printed as hardcover books.
David Saunders
Emmet Watson with another Burroughs story “Seven Worlds To Conquer.” I read a lot of Burroughs Ballantine and Ace paperbacks when I was a kid but I don’t remember this one. Either it was never reprinted or they changed the name.
David Saunders
Rudolph Belarski was a famous pulp artist. This story from 1938 ties into the fascist dictators making trouble in Europe at the time.
David Saunders
Another Belarski cover with another Tarzan novel. I wonder which one?
David Saunders
Another Belarski cover. David said that was a really scary looking demon on the cover.
David Saunders
Virgil Finlay was one of the finest science fiction / fantasy artist who ever lived. He was known mostly for his highly detailed pen and ink interior illustrations.
David Saunders
H.J. Ward was another famous pulp artist.
David Saunders
David’s famous dad Norman Saunders. Saunders drew the famous Topps bubblegum card sets Batman, Battle and Mars Attacks. I bought a nearly complete set of the Battle cards in the 1960s was quite impressed with how violent and bloody they were. I still have them tucked away. In today's repressive politically correct culture where kids are expelled from public school for bringing a water pistol to class these cards would make their liberal teachers' heads explode. Thank God I grew up in the 1960s.
David Saunders
Norman Rockwell is probably the most famous American magazine cover artist in history. Normally he worked on prestige slick magazines like The Saturday Evening Post and wouldn’t go near a sleazy pulp magazine. David told us that near the end of career when magazine cover illustrations were replaced by photographic covers that Rockwell was wiling to do some slumming for Argosy with this John Wayne cover.
David Saunders
Argosy ceased publication in 1978 but in the mid 1990s a new version briefly appeared. Comic book and paperback artist Jim Steranko did a few covers in the old pulp style.
Joseph Coluccio
After David Saunders another pulp expert, Joseph Coluccio of Pittsburg gave his slide presentation ”Amazing Stories - The First Science Fiction Pulp.”
Joseph Coluccio
This 1927 issue by cover artist Frank R. Paul is perhaps the most famous Amazing Stories cover. It depicts the H.G.Wells novel "The War of the Worlds" with the invading Martian tripod war machines. As noted earlier, H.G. Wells was named on the cover of the first 29 issues of Amazing Stories.
Joseph Coluccio
Noted artist Hans W. Wesso drew an interesting big green monster for this late 1920s cover. I bought a large pulp collection in Kingston, New York in October 2015 and this issue was present. It wasn’t in high enough grade for me so I sold it on ebay.
Joseph Coluccio
Mr. Coluccio’s strayed a bit from the main topic. Here’s a slide of Science Fiction Digest with a an illustration of my favorite science fiction writer, Clifford D. Simak. Notice the big names listed that are familiar to comic book fans: Mortimer Weisinger who edited DC Superman comics in the 1950s and early 1960s; Julius Schwartz who was the top DC editor who invented the Silver Age of Comic Books in 1956 with the revival of the Flash; Forrest J. Ackerman who edited Famous Monsters of Filmland; Raymond Palmer was the editor of Amazing Stories in the 1950s and was heavily involved in Flying Saucers and other pseudoscience fads.
Joseph Coluccio
Here’s something really rare: a copy of “science fiction’s first fan magazine,” The Time Traveler with the same three big names, Mortimer Weisinger, Julius Schwartz, Forrest J. Ackerman. Before he became a DC Comics editor, Julie Schwartz had been a science fiction literary agent. He recruited Mort Weisinger, Gardner F. Fox, Edmond Hamilton and other sci-fi pulp writers to work at DC Comics in the 1940s and 1950s.
Joseph Coluccio
Science fiction great Isaac Asimov’s first published story was in the March 1939 issue of Amazing Stories. Too bad Julie Schwartz couldn’t recruit him for DC. A copy of this issue was in the pulp collection I bought in October 2015 and in decent shape so I squirled it away in my collection.
Joseph Coluccio
Fan letters from Isaac Asimov, Edmond Hamilton and noted science fiction author and historian Sam Moskowitz.
Joseph Coluccio
Here’s the January 1950 issue of Amazing Stories with three sexy babes. Nearly every issue of Amazing Stories from the 1940s and 190s has at least one obligatory sexy babe. Mr. Coluccio said that the author noted on the cover, Richard S. Shaver, was even crazier than his editor boss Raymond Palmer. Shavers claimed he discovered some weird people living in a cave that was an outpost of the lost continent of Lemur that sank in the Pacific Ocean thousands of years ago.

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